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The Top 10 In The World Superfoods for a Healthy Lifestyle

Superfoods

Water

Drink 8 to 12 cups of water daily.

Dark Green Vegetable Superfoods

Superfoods Eat dark green vegetables at least three to four times a week. Good options include broccoli, peppers, Brussels sprouts, and leafy greens like kale and spinach.

Whole Grains

Eat whole grains at least two or three times daily. Look for whole wheat flour, rye, oatmeal, barley, amaranth, quinoa, or a multigrain. A good source of fiber has 3 to 4 grams of fiber per serving. A great source has 5 or more grams of fiber per serving.

Beans and Lentils Superfoods

Try to eat a bean-based meal at least once a week. Add legumes, including beans and lentils, to soups, stews, casseroles, salads, and dips, or eat them plain.

Fish

Try to eat two to three servings of fish a week. A serving consists of 3 to 4 ounces of cooked fish. Good choices are salmon, trout, herring, bluefish, sardines, and tuna.

Berries

Include two to four servings of fruit in your diet each day. Try to eat raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, and strawberries.

Winter Squash

Eat butternut, acorn squash, and other richly pigmented dark orange and green colored vegetables like sweet potato, cantaloupe, and mango.

Soy

Twenty-five grams of soy protein daily is recommended as part of a low-fat diet to help lower cholesterol levels. Try tofu, soy milk, edamame soybeans, tempeh, and texturized vegetable protein (TVP).

Flaxseed, Nuts, and Seeds

Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed or other seeds to food daily, or include a moderate amount of nuts – 1/4 cup – in your daily diet.

Organic Yogurt Superfoods

Men and women between 19 and 50 need 1000 milligrams of calcium daily and 1200 milligrams if 50 or older. Eat calcium-rich Superfoods such as nonfat or low-fat dairy products three to four times daily. Include organic choices.

Behavior Modification Ideas for Weight Management

Weight management involves adopting a healthy lifestyle that includes a knowledge of nutrition and exercise, a positive attitude, and the right kind of motivation. Internal motives such as better health, increased energy, self-esteem, and personal control increase your chances of lifelong weight management success.

Remember to have realistic goals and think about long-term success. Believe in yourself, and you can do it. The following information will give you ideas to help you meet your goals.

#Control Your Home Environment

  • Eat only while sitting down at the kitchen or dining room table. Do not eat while watching television, reading, cooking, talking on the phone, standing at the refrigerator, or working on the computer.
  • Keep tempting foods out of the house — don’t buy them.
  • Keep tempting foods out of sight. Have low-calorie Superfoods ready to eat.
  • Unless you are preparing a meal, stay out of the kitchen.
  • Have healthy snacks, such as small pieces of fruit, vegetables, canned fruit, pretzels, low-fat string cheese, and nonfat cottage cheese.

#Control Your Work Environment

  • Do not eat at your desk or keep tempting snacks at your desk.
  • Plan healthy snacks and bring them to work if you get hungry between meals.
  • During your breaks, go for a walk instead of eating.
  • If you work around food, plan the one item you will eat at mealtime.
  • Make it inconvenient to nibble on food by chewing gum, sugarless candy, or drinking water or another low-calorie beverage.
  • Do not work through meals. Skipping meals slows down metabolism and may result in overeating at the next meal.
  • If food is available for special occasions, pick the healthiest item, nibble on low-fat snacks brought from home, don’t have anything offered, choose one option and a small amount, or have only a beverage.

#Control Your Mealtime Environment

  • Serve your plate of food at the stove or kitchen counter. Do not put the serving dishes on the table. If you put dishes on the table, remove them immediately after eating.
  • Fill half of your plate with vegetables, a quarter with lean protein, and a quarter with starch.
  • Use smaller plates, bowls, and glasses. A smaller portion will look enormous when it is in a little dish.
  • Politely refuse second helpings.
  • Limit food portions to one scoop/serving or less when fixing your plate.

Daily Food Management

  • Replace eating with another activity that you will not associate with food.
  • Wait 20 minutes before eating something you are craving.
  • Drink a large glass of water or diet soda before eating.
  • Always have a big glass or bottle of water throughout the day.
  • Avoid high-calorie add-ons like Cream with your coffee, butter, mayonnaise, and salad dressings.

Shopping

  • Do not shop when hungry or tired.
  • Shop from a list and avoid buying anything, not on your list.
  • If you must have tempting Superfoods, buy individual-sized packages and try to find a lower-calorie alternative.
  • Don’t taste test in the store.
  • Read food labels. Compare products to help you make the healthiest choices.

Preparation

  • Chew a piece of gum while cooking meals.
  • Use a quarter teaspoon if you taste test your food.
  • Try only to fix what you will eat, leaving yourself no chance for seconds.
  • If you have prepared more food than you need, portion it into individual containers and freeze or refrigerate it immediately.
  • Don’t snack while cooking meals.

Eating

  • Eat slowly. Remember, it takes about 20 minutes for your stomach to send a message to your brain that it is complete. Don’t let fake hunger make you think you need more.
  • The ideal way to eat is to take a bite, put your utensil down, take a sip of water, cut your next bite, take a bit, put your utensil down, and so on.
  • Do not cut your food all at one time. Cut only as needed.
  • Take small bites and chew your food well.
  • Stop eating for a minute or two at least once during a meal or snack. Take breaks to reflect and have a conversation.

Cleanup and Leftovers

  • Label leftovers for a specific meal or snack.
  • Freeze or refrigerate individual portions of leftovers.
  • Do not clean up if you are still hungry.

Eating Out and Social Eating Superfoods

  • Do not arrive hungry. Eat something light before the meal.
  • Try to fill up on low-calorie foods, such as vegetables and fruit, and eat smaller portions of high-calorie foods.
  • Eat Superfoods that you like, but choose small portions.
  • If you want seconds, wait at least 20 minutes after eating to see if you are hungry or if your eyes are bigger than your stomach.
  • Limit alcoholic beverages. Try soda water with a twist of lime.
  • Do not skip other meals in the day to save room for the special event.

#At Restaurants

  • Order à la carte rather than buffet style.
  • Order some vegetables or a salad for an appetizer instead of eating bread.
  • If you order a high-calorie dish, share it with someone.
  • Try an after-dinner mint with your coffee. If you do have dessert, share it with two or more people.
  • Don’t overeat because you do not want to waste food. Ask for a doggie bag to take extra food home.
  • Tell the server to put half of your entree in a to-go bag before the meal is served to you.
  • Ask for salad dressing, gravy, or high-fat sauces on the side. Dip the tip of your fork in the dressing before each bite.
  • If bread is served, ask for only one piece. Try it plain without butter or oil. Italian restaurants where oil and vinegar are served with bread use only a tiny amount of oil and a lot of vinegar for dipping.

#At a Friend’s House

  • Offer to bring a dish, appetizer, or dessert that is low in calories.
  • Serve small portions or tell the host you only want a small amount.
  • Stand or sit away from the snack table. Stay away from the kitchen or stay busy if you are near the food.
  • Limit your alcohol intake.

#At Buffets and Cafeterias

  • Cover most of your plate with lettuce and vegetables.
  • Use a salad plate instead of a dinner plate.
  • After eating, clear away your dishes before having coffee or tea.

Entertaining at Home

  • Explore low-fat, low-cholesterol cookbooks.
  • Use single-serving Superfoods like chicken breasts or hamburger patties.
  • Prepare low-calorie appetizers and desserts.

Holidays

  • Keep tempting foods out of sight.
  • Decorate the house without using food.
  • Have low-calorie beverages and Superfoods on hand for guests.
  • Allow yourself one planned to treat a day.
  • Don’t skip meals to save up for the holiday feast. Eat regular, planned meals.

Exercise Well

  • Make exercise a priority and a planned activity in the day.
  • If possible, walk the entire or part of the distance to work.
  • Get an exercise buddy. Go for a walk with a colleague during one of your breaks, go to the gym, run or take a walk with a friend, or walk in the mall with a shopping companion.
  • Park at the end of the parking lot and walk to the store or office entrance.
  • Always take the stairs or at least part of the way to your floor.
  • If you have a desk job, walk around the office frequently.
  • Do leg lifts while sitting at your desk.
  • Do something outside on the weekends, like hiking or riding a bike.

Have a Healthy Attitude

  • Make health your weight management priority.
  • Be realistic. Have a goal to achieve a healthier you, not necessarily the lowest weight or ideal weight based on calculations or tables.
  • Focus on a healthy eating style, not on dieting. Dieting usually lasts for a short time and rarely produces long-term success.
  • Think long-term. You are developing new healthy behaviors to follow next month, in a year and a decade.

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns with your provider.

Calcium Content of Superfoods

Dairy and Soy

Amount    

Calcium (mg)   

Milk (skim, low Fat, whole)

1 cup

300    

Buttermilk

1 cup

300

Cottage Cheese

0.5 cup

65

Ice Cream or Ice Milk

0.5 cup

100

Sour Cream, cultured

1 cup

250

Soy Milk, calcium-fortified

1 cup

200 to 400

Yogurt

1 cup

450

Yogurt drink

12 oz

300

Carnation Instant Breakfast    

1 packet

250

Hot Cocoa, calcium-fortified

1 packet

320

Nonfat dry milk powder

5 Tbsp

300

Brie Cheese

1 oz

50

Hard Cheese (cheddar, jack)    

1 oz

200

Mozzarella

1 oz

200

Parmesan Cheese

1 Tbsp

70

Swiss or Gruyere

1 oz

270

Vegetables

Acorn squash, cooked

1 cup  

90    

Arugula, raw

1 cup

125

Bok Choy, raw

1 cup

40

Broccoli cooked

1 cup

180

Chard or Okra, cooked

1 cup

100

Chicory (curly endive), raw    

1 cup

40

Collard greens

1 cup

50

Corn, brine packed

1 cup

10

Dandelion greens, raw

1 cup

80

Kale, raw

1 cup

55

Kelp or Kombe

1 cup

60

Mustard greens

1 cup

40

Spinach, cooked

1 cup

240

Turnip greens, raw

1 cup

80

Fruits

Figs, dried, uncooked

1 cup  

300    

Kiwi, raw

1 cup

50

Orange juice, calcium-fortified

8 oz

300

Orange juice from the concentrate    

1 cup

20

Legumes

Garbanzo Beans cooked

1 cup

80    

Legumes, general, cooked    

0.5 cup

15 to 50

Pinto Beans, cooked

1 cup

75

Soybeans, boiled

0.5 cup    

100

Tempe

0.5 cup

75

Tofu, firm, calcium set

4 oz    

250 to 750    

Tofu, soft regular

4 oz

120 to 390

White Beans, cooked

0.5 cup

70

Grains

Cereals (calcium fortified)    

0.5 to 1 cup    

250 to 1000    

Amaranth, cooked

0.5 cup

135

Bread, calcium-fortified

1 slice   

150 to 200

Brown rice, long grain, raw    

1 cup

50

Oatmeal, instant

1 package

100 to 150

Tortillas, corn

2

85

Nuts and Seeds

Almonds toasted unblanched

1 oz.

80

Sesame seeds, whole roasted    

1 oz.

280

Sesame tahini

1 oz. (2 Tbsp)    

130    

Sunflower seeds dried

1 oz.

50

Fish

Mackerel, canned    

3 oz.    

250

Salmon, canned, with bones    

3 oz.

170 to 210    

Sardines

3 oz.

370

Other

Molasses, blackstrap    

1 Tbsp    

135    

* When the range is given, calcium content varies by product.

* The calcium content of plant foods is varied. Most vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and dried fruit contain some calcium. Listed are selected significant sources of well-absorbed calcium.

References:

  • USDA database, Handbook 8 palm program
  • Bowes and Church

How Much Do You Need?

Age

Calcium (mg)  

1 – 3 year old

500 mg    

4 — 8 year old

800 mg

9 – 18 year old

1300 mg

19 – 50 year old

1000 mg

51 – 70 year old     

1200 mg

70 and older

1200 mg

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns with your provider.

Cholesterol Content of Foods

If you have risk factors for heart disease, you should not consume more than 200 milligrams of cholesterol daily.

If you do not have risk factors for heart disease, you should limit your cholesterol intake to no more than 300 milligrams a day.

Use the following tables to check your foods’ cholesterol and fat content. This will help you keep track of your daily cholesterol intake.

Note: Cholesterol is only found in animal products. Fruits, vegetables, grains, and all other plant foods do not have any cholesterol at all.

Dairy Products

Portion

Cholesterol (mg)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Milk (nonfat)

1 cup

4

0

0

Milk (low-fat)

1 cup

10

3

2

Milk (whole)

1 cup

33

8

5

Yogurt (nonfat)

1 cup

10

0

0

Yogurt (whole)

1 cup

29

7

5

Cheddar Cheese

1 oz 30 9

6

Cottage Cheese (low-fat)

1 cup

10

2

2

Fats

Portion

Cholesterol (mg)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Butter

1 tsp

11

4

3

Margarine

1 tsp

0

4

1

Vegetable Oils                  

1 tsp

0

5

1 – 2

Meats & Protein

Portion

Cholesterol (mg)

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Tofu

1/2 cup

0

11

2

Pinto beans

1/2 cup

0

1

0

Egg

1

212

5

2

Halibut

3 ½ oz

41

3

0

Salmon

3 ½ oz

63

12

2

Oysters

3 ½ oz

55

2

1

Crab

3 ½ oz

52

1

0

Lobster

3 ½ oz

71

1

0

Tuna (in water)

3 ½ oz

30

1

0

Shrimp

3 ½ oz

194

1

0

Squid

3 ½ oz

231

1

0

Beef (ground, lean)         

3 ½ oz

78

18

7

Beef (short ribs)

3 ½ oz

94

42

18

Beef (sirloin)

3 ½ oz

89

12

5

Beef Liver

3 ½ oz

389

5

2

Veal (top round)

3 ½ oz

135

5

2

Lamb (foreshank)

3 ½ oz

106

14

6

Ham

3 ½ oz

53

6

2

Pork (tenderloin)

3 ½ oz

79

6

2

Pork (chop)

3 ½ oz

85

25

10

Chicken Liver

3 ½ oz

631

6

2

Chicken (no skin)

3 ½ oz

85

5

1

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns with your provider.

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